Simple concepts can fuel action

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Have you ever heard of someone being so passionate about a cause they raised $25,000 on stickers? Recently, I read an article explaining this very situation. In an attempt to identify stores that welcome all customers and are not discriminatory towards gay people, companies would buy these stickers to support the protest of an Indiana law that allows business owners to discriminate against gay people. 80% of these stickers were sold in Indiana, while the directory includes 30 states and seven countries.

All proceeds are going back to Score, a national nonprofit that mentors small-business owners as told by the article. This, to me, is genius. Any company that doesn’t purchase a sticker is basically saying they discriminate against gay people, which in turn requires action from all businesses around the area. The fact that stickers have raised $25,000 is evidence that when you sell something well, it doesn’t matter what you’re selling. In this case, it’s cooperation and participation.

Valuable lessons to take away from this article showcase that the way something is being communicated is more important than the actual item being communicated. Making your idea popular enough that other people/businesses/companies feel left out if they don’t agree or participate in the idea, can work to your advantage. Big bucks are not necessary to communicate a message effectively.

Eden Youngberg is a senior Journalism and Mass Communications major pursuing certificates in Philanthropy and Entrepreneurship. She is involved in Public Relations Student Society of America and is currently working as a fundraising intern at AMPERAGE Marketing. She hopes to be involved in nonprofits after graduation in May.

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